Astro Performance Warehouse https://www.astroperformance.com APW Auto Parts Wed, 06 Nov 2019 03:03:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 2011-17 Mustang 5.0L Getrag MT-82 6 Speed Transmissions https://www.astroperformance.com/2011-17-mustang-5-0l-getrag-mt-82-6-speed-transmissions/ https://www.astroperformance.com/2011-17-mustang-5-0l-getrag-mt-82-6-speed-transmissions/#respond Thu, 17 Oct 2019 03:37:36 +0000 http://www.astroperformance.com/?p=3026 One of the Most Popular 6 Speed Transmissions being ordered and repaired today are from 2011-17 Ford Mustang 5.0L.  Issues from Gearboxes "Stuck" in 1st or 2nd Gear to Complete Gear Failure in 3rd, 4th, or 5th are the norm.  When end users come to us for answers of how to Fix and/or Upgrade their... Read More

The post 2011-17 Mustang 5.0L Getrag MT-82 6 Speed Transmissions appeared first on Astro Performance Warehouse.

]]>
One of the Most Popular 6 Speed Transmissions being ordered and repaired today are from 2011-17 Ford Mustang 5.0L.  Issues from Gearboxes "Stuck" in 1st or 2nd Gear to Complete Gear Failure in 3rd, 4th, or 5th are the norm.  When end users come to us for answers of how to Fix and/or Upgrade their Getrag MT-82 6 Speed, we start with trying to identify what version of MT-82 they have. This is very important when selecting an In-House Core to Build/Upgrade for Customer. If End User sends in their Core for Repair, the following is Null/Void.  With this being stated, below are some important notes to consider when Purchasing a MT-82 6 Speed Gearbox from Astro Performance.

MT-82 Identification Notes:

2011 & Early 2012 Ford Mustang 5.0L MT-82 6 Speeds have a Casting Number on Drivers Side of Main Case/Bellhousing.  Example: BR3R-7006-AA or BR3R-7006-AB  Both of these Casting Numbers allow us to know that each Unit featured a "Deeper" Bellhousing vs Mid 2012 thru 2017 Ford Mustang 5.0L MT-82 6 Speeds. An Example of the "AB" Casting is shown in Pics.

When Getrag Cast the Bellhousings the Slave Cylinder that Ford wanted to use, which was the same used in the 2005-10 Ford Mustang 4.6L TR-3650 5 Speed, would not reach the clutch pressure plate fingers.  So Clutch Release would be an issue.  So, Ford ended up making a .444" Thick Aluminum Spacer to move the Slave Cylinder forward so that proper clutch release could be acquired.  With this being said it is Very Important that an end User that has an "AA or AB" Code cast on Bellhousing/Main Case reuse the slave cylinder spacer that came with gearbox after repairing and/or upgrading their gearbox.  Now, if the Code is anything other than the "AA or AB", the Slave Cylinder Spacer is NOT to be used.  That is due to Ford changing the Bellhousing/Case Castings to be "shorter" in depth so that spacer didn't have to be used from mid 2012-2017 years.  Please know that the actual Slave Cylinder used from 2005-2017 Ford Mustang 4.6L/5.0L was equal.  So, whether you have a unit that requires the Spacer or Not, the slave cylinder will attach to Spacer or simply to the bellhousing.  Of course you will need longer style bolts if the spacer is used! But, the bolts would be included with the original gearbox..just don't loose them!  If you loose the spacer and it is needed, you will be forced to purchase an aftermarket spacer & bolts.  Ford No Longer Sells the Spacer or Bolts! Picture of the Aluminum Slave Cylinder Spacer is shown in Pics.

All V8 MT-82 Transmissions have a "Flat" Bellhousing at top.  Whereas the 4 Cyl. & 6 Cyl. have a "Rounded" Style Bellhousing at top. We mostly stock V8 MT-82 Cores as that is where most of our Sales are directed. Every once in awhile we will get a 6 Cyl. Core thrown in with Cores we purchase. But, for the most part end users looking to Buy a 4 or 6 Cyl. MT-82 will have to send in their core up front for us to Repair and/or Upgrade.

MT-82 Skip Shift Solenoid Notes:

We have seen 2011-Early 2013 Mustang 5.0L Getrag MT-82 6 Speeds to have a Skip Shift Solenoid located on Passenger Side of Tailshaft (Extension) Housing.  The Skip Shift Solenoid, if featured, would be located on the Passenger Side of Tailshaft Housing at top in the Center.  It would be held to Tailshaft Housing by two bolts. Skip Shift Solenoid was originally featured on the earlier MT-82's where if an end user was in 1st Gear for an extended period of time, the computer would signal a light on the dash stating for the user to "shift into 4th gear".  Now, when end users do upgrades to vehicle that require use of a Aftermarket Hand-Held Tuner, a lot of Tuners have "turned off" the Skip Shift Feature.  This doesn't mean that the transmission doesn't feature the solenoid.  It just means that all the Solenoid does when its turned off it fill the hole so No Oil Escapes.  So, when a MT-82 is sold, a common question asked by us is if the original transmission being replaced had skip shift or not. If the Transmission Core we have at time of Sale has Skip Shift Solenoid, but car it goes into didn't, leave the solenoid in the transmission we provide you. You won't have any Harness to hook into it. But, it will act as a Freeze Plug to seal the Hole.  Now, I have included two images of a Gearbox we sell that has the Skip Shift Solenoid Bolted to Tailshaft Housing. As well as another one that shows a Tailshaft Housing that has a Pilot Hole for a Skip Shift, but, it is not drilled thru the tailshaft housing.  Ford used the same Tailshaft Housing Castings from 2011-17 Mustang 5.0L MT-82's. They just saved some time in not have to drill and tap two bolt holes and finish boring thru the tailshaft housing like they did on the 2011-13 Models.

MT-82 Output Shaft Flanges:

2011-2014 Ford Mustang 5.0L Getrag MT-82 6 Speed = 4 Bolt Flange. The Flange being explained is how the driveshaft attaches to transmission.  Driveshaft is secured by 4 Bolts to Transmission.

2015-2017 Ford Mustang 5.0L Getrag MT-82 6 Speed = 3 Bolt Flange. The Flange being explained is how the driveshaft attaches to transmission.  Driveshaft is secured by 4 Bolts to Transmission.

MT-82 Transmission Fluid:

All MT-82 6 Speeds shipped out to end users DO NOT INCLUDE OIL.  End user must fill Gearbox with approximately 2.7 Qts. of Fluid before Operation. We recommend either the Ford Authorized Fluid with Additive/Modifier, or AMSOIL Synchromesh (2 Qts) + AMSOIL 75/90W Transaxle Gear Oil (.7 Qt.).  The AMSOIL recommendation has proven to be the Best in our opinion for Higher RPM Shifting and Synchronizer Life.

 

 

The post 2011-17 Mustang 5.0L Getrag MT-82 6 Speed Transmissions appeared first on Astro Performance Warehouse.

]]>
https://www.astroperformance.com/2011-17-mustang-5-0l-getrag-mt-82-6-speed-transmissions/feed/ 0
Some Information about the Current Model Tremec 6 Speed https://www.astroperformance.com/information-current-model-tremec-6-speed/ Wed, 13 Mar 2019 20:27:14 +0000 http://www.astroperformance.com/?p=2306 The Tremec TR-6060 6 Speed Transmission is the most widely used Performance 6 Speed Used in Domestic RWD Sports Cars since 2007.  Cars like the Shelby GT-500, Cadillac CTS-V, Chevrolet Camaro (Including ZL1), and Chevrolet Corvette Z06 (Including ZR1) all featured the Tremec TR-6060 6 Speed. The Gearboxes placed in the vehicles featured Upgrades that... Read More

The post Some Information about the Current Model Tremec 6 Speed appeared first on Astro Performance Warehouse.

]]>
The Tremec TR-6060 6 Speed Transmission is the most widely used Performance 6 Speed Used in Domestic RWD Sports Cars since 2007.  Cars like the Shelby GT-500, Cadillac CTS-V, Chevrolet Camaro (Including ZL1), and Chevrolet Corvette Z06 (Including ZR1) all featured the Tremec TR-6060 6 Speed. The Gearboxes placed in the vehicles featured Upgrades that were far more advanced than the earlier Tremec T-56 6 Speed found in Pre-2006 Sports Cars.  Advancements & Upgrades included:

-Multi-Piece Design Synchronizer Rings on all Forward & Reverse Gears. The Synchronizer Rings have evolved since 2007 in three different versions.  Sintered Bronze, Carbon Fiber, and Hybrid Design.

-Larger Tapered Bearings & Cups on Input, Cluster, and Output Shaft.  Upgraded form the smaller diameter bearings on the Earlier T-56.

-Cast Steel Shift Forks used throughout with the Same Design of Fork Pad being Used from 1st thru Reverse.

-1-Piece Cluster Shaft used that does away with the 2-Piece Earlier Design T-56 that was known to "strip the splines" between the two shafts in higher horsepower applications.

The Tremec TR-6060 was also available in a multitude of Ratio's.  From the Current Hellcat TR-6060 with a 2.26 1st, to the Camaro V8 TR-6060 with a 3.11 1st, it has several benefits where "custom conversions" can be made to adapt into applications it wasn't originally meant for.  Even the idea of the Remote Mount Shifter & Bolt On Flange Output Shaft could be converted to a Slip Yoke "Direct Shifter Mounted" Tailshaft housing and output shaft.

Given the TR-6060 is still considered "current production" it is sure to be one of the more widely Manual Transmission Cores to be used for custom conversions into the future.

The post Some Information about the Current Model Tremec 6 Speed appeared first on Astro Performance Warehouse.

]]>
Steel Flywheel vs. Aluminum Flywheel? How to Decide https://www.astroperformance.com/steel-flywheel-vs-aluminum-flywheel-decide/ Fri, 04 Dec 2015 16:00:02 +0000 http://www.astroperformance.com/?p=935 Here at Astro Performance Warehouse, we enjoy receiving questions about our products from our customers. We are always happy to help a customer better understand the functions and features of our products. For today’s blog post, we’re answering one of the common questions we receive about flywheel replacement. Question: Steel flywheel vs. aluminum flywheel. Which... Read More

The post Steel Flywheel vs. Aluminum Flywheel? How to Decide appeared first on Astro Performance Warehouse.

]]>
Here at Astro Performance Warehouse, we enjoy receiving questions about our products from our customers. We are always happy to help a customer better understand the functions and features of our products.

For today’s blog post, we’re answering one of the common questions we receive about flywheel replacement.

Steel Flywheel vs. Aluminum Flywheel? How to Decide

Question: Steel flywheel vs. aluminum flywheel. Which one is better?

Answer: Most domestic factory vehicles are supplied with nodular iron steel flywheels. These flywheels either come in a neutral balance, for internally balanced engines, or externally balanced, like a lot of “push-rod” cars come equipped with.

The nodular flywheels usually only come with one clutch bolt pattern to attach the original equipment (OE) clutch to it.  Some flywheels also include dowel-pin holes to help “center” the clutch being attached.

When a clutch burns up, or simply wears out, a flywheel can take a pretty good amount of abuse. But you’ll want to consider replacing or upgrading the flywheel if there are heat cracks across the clutch disc mating surface or an uneven or “warped” clutch disc surface.

Of course with the addition of aftermarket billet steel & billet aluminum flywheels, it can be quite a challenge for some to figure out the best option for replacement.

For customers who are considering replacing a flywheel, we suggest asking these questions:

  • What is the weight of the vehicle?
  • How much horsepower at the flywheel?
  • RPM at which the customer plans to shift?
  • If racing, is an S.F.I. approved flywheel one to consider?

Cars with less than 450 horse power at flywheel that weigh more than 3,400 pounds would benefit more from a nodular or billet-steel flywheel. This is recommended as a heavier car benefits from heavier rotational weight off the end of the crankshaft helping “propel” the car through each of the shifts.

However, a car that makes more than 500 horse power at flywheel that is 3,400 pounds or less would benefit from a lighter aluminum flywheel as it will “spin up” quicker to keep the RPMs up in between shifts.

So, to answer the question “Steel flywheel vs. aluminum flywheel, which one is better?”, the answer lies in the application you own! It also depends on the end user’s budget. Nodular iron flywheels are definitely cheaper than billet steel or billet aluminum flywheels.

But, for safety, certification and high horsepower, consider a McLeod or RAM billet steel or aluminum flywheel from Astro Performance.  Please feel free to send over the application and specs of your engine.  And don’t forget to put the plans for the car and list any SFI certification that your car will be subjected to.

Do you have more questions about flywheels or any of our other products? Comment below or contact us today. We’d love to use your question in a future blog post.

Want to share this blog? We've got the tweet ready for you!

The post Steel Flywheel vs. Aluminum Flywheel? How to Decide appeared first on Astro Performance Warehouse.

]]>
What Are The Most Common Clutch Problems? https://www.astroperformance.com/common-clutch-problems/ Tue, 03 Nov 2015 14:17:06 +0000 http://www.astroperformance.com/?p=900 No one likes a faulty clutch. The clutch allows us to switch between gears, getting our vehicles to move the way we’d like them to. And when we can’t do that, there’s a problem. Here at Astro Performance Warehouse, we know all about clutches, transmissions and more. If you’re having problems with your clutch, it’s... Read More

The post What Are The Most Common Clutch Problems? appeared first on Astro Performance Warehouse.

]]>
No one likes a faulty clutch. The clutch allows us to switch between gears, getting our vehicles to move the way we’d like them to. And when we can’t do that, there’s a problem.

Here at Astro Performance Warehouse, we know all about clutches, transmissions and more. If you’re having problems with your clutch, it’s likely one of these following most common clutch problems. Read on to learn more.

Slipping Clutch

When the clutch slips, the car does not move even though the engine is revving. Often this means the clutch pedal needs to be readjusted or you have a worn clutch.

Trouble Shifting Gears

This is another indicator that something is wrong with your clutch. Experts say this could mean that an external or internal transmission part is damaged or worn. An internal problem may require a rebuilt or replacement transmission.

Sticky Clutch

When your clutch gets stuck, as when it goes down but it doesn’t come back up, that is another problem. This typically means the clutch master or the slave cylinder has a leak in its external seal and it must be replaced.

Fluid Leaks

Fluid leaks are a common problem for manual transmissions. Leaks often occur in the clutch components, like the master and slave cylinder and the hydraulic lines.  Because fluids keep the internal components operating properly, it’s important that they be replaced regularly. Experts suggest fluids be changed around 45,000 to 60,000 miles.

Clutch Pedal Abuse

What are the most common clutch problems?

Properly operating the clutch is one of the best ways to keep your manual transmission running smoothly. When you come to a stop at traffic lights, you should keep your foot off the clutch. Otherwise you are helping to wear it down. Skipping gears is also another problem.

Are you in the market for a new clutch or transmission? We’ve got the parts you need to rebuild it yourself. Contact us today.

The post What Are The Most Common Clutch Problems? appeared first on Astro Performance Warehouse.

]]>
The History of the Mustang https://www.astroperformance.com/history-mustang/ Mon, 12 Oct 2015 12:00:49 +0000 http://www.astroperformance.com/?p=300 The History of the Mustang The Mustang. This majestic machine – a cultural icon of sorts – has cruised across the American landscape for more than a half century, stumbling through a series of sometimes strange, sometimes wonderful and always surprising incarnations. And like its namesake – the wild horse brought to the Americas by... Read More

The post The History of the Mustang appeared first on Astro Performance Warehouse.

]]>
The History of the Mustang

The Mustang. This majestic machine – a cultural icon of sorts – has cruised across the American landscape for more than a half century, stumbling through a series of sometimes strange, sometimes wonderful and always surprising incarnations.

And like its namesake – the wild horse brought to the Americas by Spaniard hundreds of years ago – Ford Mustang performance has remained largely untamed, its development and evolution paralleling with uncanny clarity the historic trajectory of the United States.

The Mustang, at once beloved yet somehow marred with so many mechanical inconsistencies, just can’t seem to shake itself from the unsettling adoration of so much of the American public.

We had to have the Mustang. It identified us. It defined us. It reminded us of who and what we are – with all of our faults, with all our missteps, in all of our grandeur.

Yet Ford Motor Company’s fixation on this arguably automotive experiment could never be withdrawn. The Mustang – like that intractable uncle at holiday gatherings – was here to stay. It would rise and fall and rise again through five decades, catching at various times scoffing glances when engineers introduced blatantly inferior and sometimes ridiculous mutations. But America’s love affair with the Mustang could never fade. As if by surprise, this iconic institution called the Mustang would emerge from the wreckage of so many failed redesigns to take the public’s breath away – once again.

The 1960s

In the early 1960s, Ford marketing executives were not necessarily eyeing the growing establishment of a uniquely American institution. Baby boomers were coming of age and would need inexpensive and hopefully – if engineers could make it happen – sporty traveling arrangements. The first Mustang on the market would follow the arrival of the four mop-top boys from Liverpool (the Beatles) by little more than two months.

One of the first mass-produced incarnations was the 1964 ½ production, an inexpensive and extremely attractive body placed on the frame of the compact Falcon, the smallest Ford at the time. The new Mustang was similar in so many ways to its older brother, the Falcon, but with small changes to target younger drivers. Compared to the Falcon, the cockpit was further back making for a longer hood; it also had that running horse on the grille.

Excluding the Corvette, this was magic on the road – but the Mustang had a few unpleasant secrets tucked under its hood. To call engine performance in many of its versions lame would certainly not have been an understatement.

The handsome fancy-pants Mustang of 1964 dare not play outdoors with the growling, snarling Corvette. If the early Mustang could’ve have blushed, it certainly would have with the 2.8-liter straight six (with 101 horsepower directing traffic. Other engines, such as the 3.3-liter, hardly improved on the zipping. Even the larger engines, such as the 4.3-liter V8, had to breathe through two carburetor barrels, making a dash through suburbia a breathless affair.

The exception was the “K-code.” This lusty monster packed a 4.7-liter, four-barrel V8 for 271 horsepower, which made even the big boys on the street think twice about knocking that chip off this Mustang’s shoulder.

At this size and expense, the 1964 Mustang was considered a “pony car” and sold a surprising – and ironically disconcerting – 126,538 models. The number was good – for those in the marketing department.

Few significant changes were made to the 1965 model – a fastback body, GT equipment and optional front disc brakes. But 1965 proved to be a year of revelation for Ford concerning the Mustang brand. It appeared the public’s appetite for this new animal had been significantly whetted. Sales were remarkable: 409,260 coupes, 77,079 fastbacks and 73,112 convertibles – more than a half million in total.

This was also the year when Chevrolet’s Corvette started to get nervous. Eyeing the Corvette’s taillights, Ford engineers began contemplating putting the star of the show to shame.

Putting the Corvette firmly in his crosshairs, Texan Carroll Shelby took a few of the GT 350s and began some major changes; the race car driver removed the rear seats, added oversize tires on 15-inch wheels, lowered the suspension and added a fiberglass hood. Shelby’s modifications brought the Mustang star to new heights and are still considered today to be highlights of the brand, which continued through 1970.

In those first two and a half years, more than 1.2 million Mustangs were sold, an astonishing feat in the automotive industry at the time. The bar had been set – extremely high – and engineers had the inexorable task of maintaining, or increasing, the momentum.

As could have been expected, 1967 began with challenges to the Mustang brand – but through no fault or faltering of Ford engineers (at least not yet). Chevrolet engineers certainly weren’t taking a nap during the Mustang ascendancy. The Camaro, Pontiac’s Firebird and Plymouth’s Barracuda had no intentions of sitting on the sidelines as Mustang basked in the spotlight.

And to Ford’s credit, Mustang engineers took notice – although their efforts seemed somehow not quite completely thought through. Ford built a larger, meaner Mustang, but placed it on the same chassis. The Mustang also got a wider engine in a wider front, making it more stable than earlier models. As the race to the top got underway, Ford sold 356,271 coupes, 71,042 2+2s and44,808 convertibles, still impressive considering the added competition.

As the decade came to a close, the Mustang underwent several more makeovers and intense sessions at the automotive gym with larger models. Powertrains expanded in 1969 and Ford began taking notice of the luxury crowd with production of the “Grande” model. For those who wanted to stretch their wheels against their Corvette brethren, Ford packed 351-, 390- and 428-cubic-inch engines into its new “Mach 1.”

Ignoring the Corvette Z28 just wasn’t an option for engineers in the year of Aquarius. The Boss 302 – and later the Boss 429 – roared onto the scene. The 429 carried (who would have guessed?) the 429 cubic-inch engine (that’s 7 liters) with a hemi-headed V8 ready to tear up the track in NASCAR competition.

Ford sold a spectacular 299,824 Mustangs in 1969. The following year, after doing some minor tweaks, 190,727 Mustangs were sold. The Mustang was on a roll, but the 1970s proved to be a test of ingenuity and longevity for the manufacturer. The question: How far can this baby roll?

Read part 2, the 1970s, in this continuing series on the history of the Mustang.

The post The History of the Mustang appeared first on Astro Performance Warehouse.

]]>